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FIVE QUESTIONS TO DETERMINE YOUR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION EXPOSURE

By Business Protection Bulletin | No Comments

For many organizations, the loss of income coupled with continuing expenses after a fire or other disaster can be even more devastating than the damage itself.

To increase the chances that a loss will not shut operations down permanently, organizations must assess their exposures accurately by asking some questions.

(…continued)

  • What is the most the organization could lose from a shutdown? Commercial Property insurance policies define “loss of income” as the sum of the expected pre-tax profit or loss and necessary continuing expenses. For example, if the expected profit is $300,000 and necessary continuing expenses are $100,000, the potential loss of income is $400,000. To calculate their exposure to business interruption losses, organizations should refer to their balance sheets, profit and loss statements, and cash flow statements. Insurance companies also have worksheets available to assist with the calculation.
  • How much insurance should be carried? Once the organization knows the dollar amount of its exposure, it must decide how much Business Interruption insurance to buy. The key considerations are the length of time the insurance is likely to apply and the coinsurance percentage the organization must meet. Coverage usually begins 72 hours following the damage to the property and ends when business resumes at another location or when the building should be repaired with reasonable speed, whichever occurs first. If the organization decided that the coverage period would be around six months, it could buy an amount of insurance that would satisfy a 50% coinsurance requirement. If the interruption would last longer, higher coinsurance percentage and limits would be necessary.
  • How long will it take business to return to normal? Even after operations resume, it could be some time before revenue returns to normal levels. Customers who had gone elsewhere during the shutdown might be slow to return. The standard insurance policy extends coverage for 30 days after operations resume, but some businesses might need more time than that, especially if their businesses are seasonal. For example, a seaside restaurant in New Jersey that makes most of its profits during the summer will need additional coverage even if it can re-open in November.
  • How much of the normal payroll expense will continue during the shutdown? The organization will need the continuing services of some employees while it attempts to re-open, but other employees might not be necessary. For example, accounting staff will be needed to pay mandatory expenses such as property taxes and collect receivables earned before the shutdown. Employees who stock shelves will not be needed if there are no shelves to stock.
  • Does the business depend on other businesses for revenue? A business can suffer a loss even if its own building is untouched. A loss that shuts down a key customer or supplier or damage to nearby property that causes authorities to close off access to the street can devastate a business’s bottom line (this happened to many businesses affected by 9/11). Special insurance coverage is available to protect against this possibility.

Our professional insurance agents can help you answer these questions and identify insurance companies that can meet coverage needs. With some effort and planning before a loss happens, an organization can emerge from a shut down and return to profitability.

ESSENTIAL RISK MANAGEMENT TIPS FOR SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS

By Business Protection Bulletin | No Comments

As every business owner knows, risk is an unavoidable part of doing business. However, it is manageable and controllable. Although it is a challenge that requires time and experimentation, finding a perfect balance between profitability and peace of mind is essential. It’s impossible to eliminate risk completely, so it’s important to set realistic goals. Policies that are enacted in an attempt to fully eliminate risk could actually hamper business growth.

The Importance of Risk Management. The common concept of risk management among small business owners involves simply purchasing regular insurance protection. Other aspects of protection often escape consideration. Risk management is much more complex than simply purchasing insurance and implementing rules. These are both necessary parts of every plan. However, there are many other things to consider.

Tips for Implementing a Realistic Risk Management Plan. It’s best to start with a simple plan that is easy to follow. The prime goals should be mitigation and management of business risks. After trying the plan, analyze it and make any necessary changes or additions. Consider the following steps in order to make a positive change:

1. Identify the Risks. There are some risks that are universal. However, there are also some that are specific only to certain types of businesses. It’s important to conduct a thorough risk analysis to identify them. The best way to accomplish this is to use a standard risk checklist. There is a Small Business Insurance & Risk Management Guide available from the Small Business Administration. This guide is helpful in outlining potential risks. While going through the list, pay close attention. Most business owners are able to think of other potential risks that are unique to their situation during this process. Some of the most important initial risks to consider include:

  • Property losses that occur from loss of use, physical damage or criminal activity.
  • Liability losses that happen to customers and are the fault of the business.
  • Business interruption losses stemming from fires, natural disasters or other unpredictable occurrences.
  • Key person losses or the loss of important employees, which results in a negative impact on the company.
  • Employee injury losses that occur when an employee is injured on the job and must be compensated.

2. Determine How Vulnerable the Company Is to Various Risks. Consider the various risks and how much each one would cost the company. Not all types of companies are as vulnerable as others. Companies with high vulnerability to expensive risks need to make those specific areas a strong priority in their risk management plan. The risks that aren’t worth worrying about should receive a much lower priority. Keep in mind that it’s not feasible to eliminate every possible risk. However, some need much more consideration than others. For example, a paper manufacturing company should consider the risk of employees losing limbs on dangerous presses in the manufacturing line before they become concerned with possible paper cuts to fingers of employees in the inspection department. As an overall rule, the cost of preventing the risk should never exceed the amount the estimated loss that might result from that risk.

3. Create a Contingency Plan. There is more to this aspect than purchasing insurance. Be sure to implement plans that place employee safety higher than efficiency. Install a security system to protect all property from theft and damage. Avoid transactions with unknown customers. Implement plans to train supervisors to minimize loss of key employees.

4. Purchase Adequate Insurance. In addition to purchasing enough insurance, it’s imperative to purchase the right types. Some of the key types of coverage to purchase include:

  • General Liability insurance, which covers the legal liabilities faced from injuries to third parties. Medical expenses, property damage and bodily damage are typically covered.
  • Professional Liability insurance, which covers allegations of malpractice, negligence and other errors in services.
  • Product Liability insurance, which covers the expenses related to injuries or damages resulting from a defective product. This is essential for all companies producing tangible products.
  • Commercial Property insurance, which covers loss and damage costs for business properties. Business interruption is typically covered by this provision.

5. Revise as Necessary. Be sure to review and update risk management plans regularly. Reassess risks and make any necessary changes. It’s important to have regular review meetings with department heads, owners and a risk management consultant. Be sure to inform the insurance company of any changes or new risks.

Business owners who plan to raise capital from investors must be especially vigilant in their risk management planning. Having a good plan and updating it regularly is important for gaining their trust and making them comfortable with the opportunity to invest.

TOUGH DAYS AHEAD FOR MANAGERS WHO DON’T WANT TO BE LEARNERS

By Your Employee Matters | No Comments

Today’s ‘pandemic’ economy in which we’re trying to get more out of everybody and everything, without having to pay for it, put managers under overwhelming pressure to perform. What can you do about it?

  • Keep growing and pushing yourself to work on your “highest and best use.” Focus on those “A activities” that produce bottom-line results. Next, delegate or outsource the B level activities (administrative functions) to the extent possible. Finally, ditch the C activities, which are simply time-wasters. Be a freak about doing this if you want to survive without burning out.
  • Become a great communicator. Whether you’re passing along the leadership vision, mission, goals, and values of your organization; working on an individual employee’s performance; or trying to learn more about what motivates employees, train yourself in communication. To be great at managing conflict, change, performance, engagement, career paths, strategic planning, and so forth without studying these disciplines, you’ll need more than experience or osmosis. So turn off your TV or computer game, ditch that fantasy league or online gossip, and pick up a book or program that will help you learn in these areas. Of course if you have access to the HR That Works program, the special reports, training modules and webinars would be a good place to start.
  • Learn what employees want from you:
    • -Be clear with them
    • -Don’t play favorites
    • -Do what you say you’re going to do, when you said you’ll do it
    • -Provide feedback on a regular basis
    • -Help define their career path
    • -Keep yourself emotionally balanced

-Remember, a poor relationship with managers is one of the top three reasons for employee turnover. Managers also influence the other two reasons (hiring a misfit, or failing to provide career growth and opportunity).

DISCLOSURE, HOME INSPECTION, AND A FINAL WALK THROUGH CAN HELP ENSURE YOU’RE GETTING THE RIGHT HOME

By Personal Perspective | No Comments

When buying a home, one with walk-in closets, a big kitchen, a big yard, or other attractive features is nice, but even the best features are a moot point if the physical condition or legal status of the home is problematic. Many potential buyers are completely confused when it comes to knowing what information on known material facts of a property must be disclosed by the seller.

Details about the legal status or physical condition of a home are called material facts. These details are often issues that aren’t obvious to a potential buyer just from looking at the home. For example, a legal status issue could stem from an ownership rights claim on the home by an ex-spouse of the seller or a structure built by a neighbor on the property line (encroachment). Whereas, physical conditions might include a leaking roof, termites, or foundation crack.

Much of the confusion regarding property disclosure is due to the fact that the law regarding property disclosure isn’t uniform. Most states do require a property disclosure form be completed by any homeowner attempting to sell their home. However, the law greatly varies by state as to what legal and repair issues must be disclosed by law. Real estate agents are an excellent source to find out what types of disclosures are legally required by the state the home is being sold in.

Typical property disclosures would inform the buyer of the following issues:

  • Leaking roof or foundation walls
  • How old shingles and roofing materials are
  • Mildew or mold damage
  • Termite damage
  • Sewer and septic system issues
  • The square footage of the home
  • Property taxes
  • Any person with a pending property claim
  • Any road plan that will subtract at least 10 feet from the front yard of the property
  • Any structure on the property for sale that also falls on an adjacent property
  • A home that’s in the flight path of the local airport
  • If any gas or oil tank is buried in the property


A disclosure form is extremely helpful in identifying any legal or physical problem(s) with a potential home, but it shouldn’t be the only precaution taken. Once the home has been appraised, the potential buyer should employ a certified and licensed professional home inspector. The inspector will examine the home for existing and potential problems. The potential buyer will then be alerted if there are any unknown problems that they want the homeowner to be responsible for prior to closing; and if there are possible future problems that they might be responsible for in the future. The potential buyer can also better evaluate if the home has a fair asking price related to any necessary repairs.

After the home inspection is complete, the home inspector will provide the potential buyer with a written report detailing the inspection results. This usually takes about 15 days post-inspection to receive. It’s important that a buyer allots enough time in their purchase offer to review the inspection report thoroughly.

The buyer might want to consider negotiating with the seller to pay for part of the repairs before closing if the report unveils too many problematic areas. When negotiation fails and/or the buyer feels the home is unfairly priced, the purchase can be canceled. If the offer of purchase included a time frame by which the buyer retains the right to back out of the deal, there usually isn’t a cancellation penalty if the purchase is canceled within the specified time frame.

As one last assurance that this is the right home, walk through the property about five days prior to closing to ensure that negotiations have been followed through with or that the home is in the agreed upon condition. Keep in mind that unless specified in the purchase offer, the seller can refuse a final walk through.

Promote Workplace Eye Wellness Month With These Tips

By Employment Resources | No Comments
During the month of March, your company can commemorate Workplace Eye Wellness Month and Save Your Vision Month. Several tips assist you in promoting healthy eyes and these important events among
your employees.
Evaluate and Adjust your Workspace
Staring at a computer screen or repetitively assembling widgets for hours at a time strains eyesight. Remind employees to evaluate their workspace, identify any strain or damage risks, and make adjustments that protect their eye health, such as:

  • Turn down the screen brightness and reduce blue light.
  • Reposition work materials to between 20 and 26 inches from your eyes.
  • Adjust your chair and posture so your worksite is slightly below your eyes level.
  • Look at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds once every 20 minutes.
  • Increase the screen font or use a magnifying glass to see small items.
  • Blink regularly throughout the day or use eye drops to prevent dry eye.

Wear the Correct Eye Safety Equipment

Employees who work with hazardous materials or operate equipment need to wear the proper eye safety equipment. Glasses, goggles and helmets, along with three steps, protect their eyesight.

  • Wear eye safety gear at all times.
  • Ensure the eye protection fits properly.
  • Replace worn or torn eye safety equipment immediately.

This month, schedule an eye safety equipment inspection. Additionally, remind employees of the procedure for reporting eye accidents or injuries. You may also offer a refresher course on how to use the eye wash and first aid stations.

Encourage a Healthy Diet

The right foods can prevent eyesight deterioration and protect eyes from damage. For optimal eye health, encourage your employees to eat foods that are high in zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E, and omega-3 fatty acids, such as:

  • Green leafy vegetables.
  • Non-meat proteins, including eggs, beans and nuts.
  • Oily fish like tuna and salmon.
  • Citrus fruit and juice.

To promote an eye-healthy diet, stock these foods in the break room or serve them during employee lunches. Also, include recipes that feature these eye-friendly ingredients in your company’s monthly newsletter.

Promote Regular Eye Checkups

An optometrist checks for vision changes and reviews eye health. The eye’s health and condition can even indicate an employee’s risk of developing diabetes, hypertension or other chronic illnesses.

If possible, provide vision insurance so your employees can visit an eye doctor at least once every year. Remind employees this month to take advantage of their vision benefit and ensure their eye health.

During Workplace Eye Wellness Month, you can follow these tips to protect your employees’ eye health and eyesight. Your insurance agent can provide additional tips that promote eye wellness this month and all year.

What is U.S. Cybersecurity Emergency Response Team?

By Cyber Security Awareness | No Comments

Malware, viruses and worms are only a few of the cybersecurity threats that affect your online security, privacy and personal information. Learn what is U.S. Cybersecurity Emergency Response Team (US-CERT), a tool that protects you every day.

History of the U.S. Cybersecurity Emergency Response Team

The US-CERT began in early 2000. The federal government noticed an increase in cyber breaches and began investigating ways to respond to these threats. Congress cooperated and created the Federal Computer Incident Response Center (FedCIRC).

In 2002, Congress transferred FedCIRC duties to the newly created Department of Homeland Security. The FedCIRC was renamed US-CERT in 2003, and its mission also expanded. The organization now coordinated and shared information and provided boundary protection for the government and cybersecurity leaders.

Over time, US-CERT developed into an authoritative source and trusted security partner for the federal government and international organizations. Private industries like banks and businesses use US-CERT resources, too.

What Does the U.S. Cybersecurity Emergency Response Team Do?

The U.S. Cybersecurity Emergency Response Team performs several critical mission activities. They:

  • Analyze data about emerging cyber threats.
  • Collaborate with foreign governments and international entities to improve the U.S.’s cybersecurity position.
  • Detect intruders and prevent cybersecurity attacks for civilian executive branches of the federal government.
  • Develop actionable tips, actions and information for a variety of agencies including international organizations, federal departments, critical infrastructure owners and operators and private industries.
  • Respond to emerging cyber threats and incidents.

How Does US-CERT Handle Potential Threats?

When the US-CERT receives a threat report from any source, including civilians, they act quickly. The team must assess the threat, determine its viability and take steps to stop it.

The department partners with several international and national organizations to ensure security of the infrastructure, systems and assets that are critical to United States security. These partners include federal agencies, international entities, research communities and private sector organizations.

Find Out About US-CERT Threats

Stay updated on potential and founded cybersecurity threats with several resources.

  • Weekly Vulnerability Bulletins – summaries of new vulnerabilities and any available patch information
  • Technical Alerts – information about incidents, vulnerabilities and trends that pose significant risk and the actions taken to minimize information loss or service disruption
  • Current Activity entries – concise descriptions of any issues and associated actions that help consumers and other entities remain safe
  • Tips – details about issues US-CERT’s constituents may find valuable, helpful or interesting
  • NVD – data that manages standards-based vulnerability

What is U.S. Cybersecurity Emergency Response Team? In a nutshell, it’s the organization that keeps you, your bank, businesses and the country safe from computer attacks that threaten our national security and your personal information. You can sleep peacefully at night because US-CERT does their job behind the scenes every day.

Cyber Risks are Real, Protect Your Business

By Cyber Security Awareness | No Comments

The federal Internet Crime Complaint Center received more than 330,000 complaints in 2009, and more than a third of them ended up in the hands of law enforcement. The damages from those referred to the authorities totaled more than a half billion dollars. The Government Accountability Office estimated that cyber crime cost U.S. organizations $67.2 billion in 2005; that number has likely increased since then. With so much of business today done electronically, organizations of all types are highly vulnerable to theft and corruption of their data. It is important for them to identify their loss exposures, possible loss scenarios, and prepare for them. Some of the questions they should ask include:

What types of property are vulnerable? 

The organization should consider property it owns, leases, or property of others it has in its custody. Some examples:

    • Money, both the organization’s own funds and those it holds as a fiduciary for someone else
    • Customer or member lists containing personally identifiable information, account numbers, cell phone numbers, and other non-public information
    • Personnel records
    • Medical insurance records
    • Bank account information
    • Confidential memos and spreadsheets
    • E-mail
    • Software stored on web servers

Different types of property will be susceptible to various threats, such as embezzlement, extortion, viruses, and theft.

What loss scenarios could occur?

The organization needs to prepare for events such as:

    • A fire destroys large portions of the computer network, including the servers. Operations cease until the servers can be replaced and reloaded with data.
    • A computer virus infects a workstation. The user of that computer unknowingly spreads it to everyone in his workgroup, crippling the department during one of the year’s peak periods.
    • The accounting department discovers a pattern of irregular small funds transfers to an account no one has ever heard of. The transfers, which have been occurring for almost three months, were small enough to avoid attracting attention. They total more than $10,000.
    • A vendor’s employee strikes up a casual conversation at a worker’s cubicle and stays long enough to memorize the worker’s computer password, written on a post-it note stuck to her monitor. Two weeks later, technology staff discovers that an offsite computer has accessed the human resources database and viewed Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers, and other personal information.

In addition to taking steps to prevent these things from happening, the organization should consider buying a Cyber insurance policy. Several insurance companies now offer this coverage; although no standard policy exists yet, the policies share some common features. They usually cover property or data damage or destruction, data protection and recovery, loss of income when a business must suspend operations due to data loss, extra expenses necessary to maintain operations following a data event, data theft, and extortion.

However, each company might define these coverages differently, so reviewing the terms and conditions of a particular policy is crucial. Choosing an appropriate amount of insurance is difficult because there is no easy way to measure the exposure in advance.

Consultation with the organization’s technology department, insurance agent and insurance company might be helpful. Finally, all policies will carry a deductible; the organization should select a deductible level that it can afford to pay and that will provide it with a meaningful discount on the premium. Once management has a thorough understanding of the coverages various policies provide in relation to the organization’s exposures, it can fairly compare the costs of the policies and make an informed choice.

Computer networks are a necessary part of any organization’s environment today. Loss prevention and reduction techniques, coupled with sound insurance protection at a reasonable cost, will enable an organization to get through a cyber loss event.

Contractors Professional Liability

By Construction Insurance Bulletin | No Comments

As a contractor, you design, build and repair homes and other structures. Purchase contractors professional liability insurance coverage to protect your assets.

What is Contractors Professional Liability?

In the 1990s, contractors professional liability coverage was introduced primarily for contractors who design and build projects. This insurance covers financial obligations associated with fixing an error or omission made by you or the subcontractors you hire.

What Does Contractors Professional Liability Cover?

Contractors professional liability insurance covers a variety of work-related circumstances, including:

  • Negligence by you or one of your hired subcontractors
  • Design errors caused by your or one of designers you hire
  • Faulty workmanship by you or one of your hired subcontractors
  • Cost overruns or delays caused by bad sequencing or lack of coordination

Additional coverage provided by contractors professional liability may include these options. Check your specific policy for details.

  • Pollution coverage for claims involving pollution from job-site activities, including failure to detect pollutants
  • Indemnity coverage if you must file a first-party claim against the project’s architect or engineer who is liable for the loss

What’s the Difference Between General and Professional Liability?

To ensure you purchase the right coverage for your business, understand the difference between general liability and professional liability.

General liability will cover bodily injury and property damage that occurs because of ordinary construction means and methods, including contract breaches. It’s definitely essential, but professional liability is important, too. It covers costs associated with damage that result from your failure to render professional services.

As an example, let’s say the handicap ramp you construct for a local business fails. You can only file a claim through your general liability policy if someone is injured or the property is damaged. Otherwise, you’ll need a professional liability policy to cover the cost of replacing the ramp.

How to Purchase Contractors Professional Liability

Purchase a contractors professional liability policy through your commercial insurance agent. You will want to purchase an annual policy based on your operational needs. Additionally, you may purchase a policy for specific projects especially if they’re extensive.

In most cases, you’ll want a true professional liability policy. You can add professional liability coverage as an endorsement or umbrella policy on your general liability policy, but it typically offers limited coverage that’s inadequate for your needs.

It’s important that as a contractor you understand your responsibilities for completing projects properly, on time and on budget. There are always risks in your industry, so purchase contractors professional liability insurance. It can pay for mistakes and protect your assets as you perform your job.

An Alert Driver is a Safe Driver

By Workplace Safety | No Comments

Going for a drive or riding in a car can be a relaxing experience, but drivers need to remain alert when behind the wheel. Although anyone could fall asleep while driving, certain target populations are more prone to having accidents because of falling asleep.

For instance, men are twice as likely as women to have an accident due to drowsiness. Teenagers, who love burning the candle at both ends, are another group with the potential to doze off while driving. In fact, teenagers and their 20-something counterparts are less likely to admit to being too fatigued to drive and will often get in the driver’s seat, even if they shouldn’t.

Naturally, there are work-related reasons that contribute to falling asleep while driving. Shift workers who work nights or rotating shifts often have trouble sleeping because their inner clock may be off kilter. Commercial drivers have an increased exposure to accidents as a result of driving during the late night and early morning hours when their biological clock tells them that they should be sleeping.

What can you do to help prevent yourself or a loved one from becoming a statistic? The best solution is a nap that lasts for about 20 minutes before you drive. Although many Americans do not allocate time for an afternoon rest, napping is a normal part of the human sleep-wake cycle. There is a biological tendency to fall asleep in mid-afternoon.

In certain parts of the world, mid-afternoon activities are brought to a halt so that people can take advantage of their natural tendency to sleep. This kind of nap that is taken before the afternoon work period begins is looked upon as a restorative activity, not idling away time that could be better spent doing other tasks.

Napping is even more important if your sleep is disturbed the night before, or you actually slept for fewer hours than your body requires. Napping the next day can help relieve your sleepiness and enhance your ability to remain alert.

The other factors to remember are that most sleep related accidents happen in non-urban areas, generally on roads with 55 mph-65 mph speed limits. When combining the restful quiet of a suburban setting with the steady pace of that speed limit, you have the makings of a situation in which a driver could easily be lulled into sleep. Also, the early morning hours are a particularly vulnerable time for drivers on extended runs.

The best remedy for these conditions is periodic rest stops in designated rest areas. Interrupting your driving for a 20-30 minute nap can make all the difference in restoring your alertness and your responsiveness. Avoid becoming a grim highway statistic. Take the time you need, and protect yourself and others on the road.

1,500 of Wasted Time on Busywork

By Employment Resources | No Comments

Work can be a life-draining affair.” Joseph Campbell

Effective time management is essential if you wish to be a successful HR executive — and have a life at the same time. According to CEO surveys, when HR professionals focus their time on administrative and compliance duties (positions in which one is particularly likely to say “no”) their companies don’t see them as being strategic partners to the business. The problem is that HR executives spend an average of only 25% of their time on strategic activities. From a career and company goals perspective, this is akin to orchestrating their own demise.

When I advise HR executives to manage their time more effectively by minimizing administrative and compliance activities, I get a variety of “reasons” why they don’t do so:

This simply has to get done.
Somebody has to do it.
I don’t have the time to delegate this right now.
There’s nobody else here to do it.
I’m not sure I would know how to delegate it properly.
I can’t manage the person to whom I delegated it.

These are all poor excuses that can block your career success.

Let’s think about some numbers. Suppose you spend an average of 10 hours a week managing payroll and other administrative tasks. Let’s say you earn $40 per hour (roughly $80,000 per year) and administrative tasks such as this are the least valuable work you do. In fact, it’s work that $20 an hour people can do. On the conservative side, every hour that you do this work, the company loses $20 an hour — which comes to $800 a month or $9,600 a year. If you put this same effort into doing $60 an hour strategic work instead, the company would gain $20 every hour — and you’d be in a far better position to ask for a raise.

Think about it: if you waste 10 hours a week for the next three years, that’s 500 hours this year, and 1,500 hours during the next three years of your life that you’ll never get back! What’s more, this waste will cost the company at least $30,000.

If you label your work as “A”, “B,” and “C” work, you should be spending 80% of your time on A Work, 20% on B work — and zero time on C work. Otherwise, you’re spinning your wheels.

C work basically wastes time completely. It’s nothing you can delegate; it’s just something you should stop doing. B work is administrative and can be delegated or outsourced — such as payroll and benefits administration. Focus on A work: What the business needs and what you want to get great at doing. A classic example would be training in a company that’s focused on technological advances.

To determine where your time is going — and should be going — use this checklist:

A-Level Activities:

  • Meeting with the executive team to understand their vision, mission, value, goals, etc.
  • Studying and understanding the company’s strategic plans, financials, succession plan, markets, branding, and other operations.
  • Identifying the critical human resource needs for this organization (surveys, observation, focus groups, interviews, etc.).
  • Input into the company’s overall compensation plan, including pay rates, incentives, bonuses, rewards programs, etc.
  • Creating strategic plans and processes for carrying out top objectives.
  • Developing training plans to support implementation.
  • Input into the company’s overall risk-management plan, including assistance with the purchase of benefit programs, Workers Comp insurance, Cyber Liability insurance, and Employment Practices Liability insurance (EPLI).
  • Creating systems for hiring, performance, retention and compliance.
  • Facilitating creativity, branding, suggestion systems, etc.
  • Implementing any other company strategic objectives to which you can provide input.

B-Level Activities:

  • Payroll and benefits administration.
  • Implementation of hiring, performance, retention and compliance systems.
  • HRIS management.
  • Delivery of training.
  • Creation of employee handbook and executive contracts.
  • Personnel files management.
  • Attendance, vacation, and leave management.
  • COBRA administration.
  • Compliance posters and handouts.

C-Level Activities:

  • Employee dramas.
  • Meetings that go nowhere.
  • Doing any $10-20/hour work.